Dams · Sand Mining

Karnataka Sand Mining 2020: Active Collector, Destruction of fish sanctuary & calm collection

Feature image: Extraction of sand from the banks of the Tunga near Chibbalagudde in Tirthahalli taluk posing a threat to the fish sanctuary that hosts 27 species of fish. (The Hindu)

2019 Karnataka sand mining overview showed that the incidents of illegal sand mining were on the rise, state was reportedly consuming around 70 MT (Million Tons) sand annually while the govt was able to produce 30 MT. The govt was losing about Rs 200 crore to illegal sand mining, while about 29,000 cases of illegal stone quarrying and sand mining were detected in past 3 years. Towards the end of 2018, the govt was seen working on 4 separate mining policies for sand, granite, building material and stone crushers to stop the revenue losses.

There were discussions in govt circle promoting M-Sand and importing sand from Malaysia. M-Sand was being produced in 18 districts of state. However there was no clarity on its quality and usage. MSIL had imported 8000 T of sand and sold half of it. Despite facing sand dearth, the govt in Sept. 2018 decided to send imported sand to Kerala. About 0.15 MT Malaysian sand was stuck at two ports.

Continue reading “Karnataka Sand Mining 2020: Active Collector, Destruction of fish sanctuary & calm collection”

Dams · DRP News Bulletin

DRP News Bulletin 08 June 2020: Banda Satyagaraha shows tip of the Sandberg

Feature image: Women in Banda performing Jal Satyagrah against illegal sand mining in Ken river. (PARI) 

Sand mining menace has been a very dark spot on India’s governance. It affects not just the river beds or flood plains, but also water security, livelihood security, biodiversity, groundwater recharge among many other aspects. Banda Satyagarah provides a striking picture to highlight this issue, but the worrying fact is that we have no real sustained positive story on this front. Even major interventions by the highest judiciary has completely failed to make any major dent on ground.

SANDRP has been bringing out statewise updates on sand mining issues for several years now as we continue to do this year too, with the link to Kerala sand mining 2020 overview can be found below. These overviews make a rather dismal readind state after state, year after year. Occasionally we get stories like the NOIDA collector Durga Shakti Nagpal fighting sand miners in 2013 or 17 year girl from Kerala awakening us in 2018 or Sandhya Ravishankar getting Goenka award for exposing the Sand mining nexus in Tamil Nadu in 2019 or now the Banda women waking us up to this dark reality. Will we wake up to our collective failure in dealing with this SANDBERG?

Continue reading “DRP News Bulletin 08 June 2020: Banda Satyagaraha shows tip of the Sandberg”

Dam floods · Maharashtra

Maharashtra Upper Krishna Basin Flood 2019 Vadnere  Committee-2: A report with “difference”!

Guest Blog by Pradeep Purandare

SANDRP published my article entitled “Maharashtra Floods 2019: Don’t waste the crisis” on 26th May 2020.In that article I had explained the reasons behind my resignation from the Flood Study Committee. Exclusion of my chapter from the committee’s report was one of the reasons. Now, the said report is available in public domain & surprisingly enough, it includes my chapter; thanks to SANDRP!

In this note, I would like to draw the attention of all concerned towards the erroneous data, strange analysis & weird logic employed by the Vadnere Committee-2 in its report without discussing the serious issues in the committee meetings. Continue reading “Maharashtra Upper Krishna Basin Flood 2019 Vadnere  Committee-2: A report with “difference”!”

Groundwater · Ken River

Groundwater in Bundelkhand: Unique geological features in upper Ken River catchment need to be conserved

Guest Blog by Seema Ravandale, People’s Science Institute, Dehradun

Kathayi (Shahnagar, Panna district), a ST (Scheduled Tribe) dominated village with 75 household amid the forested area of Shahnagar block, faces acute water scarcity during summer season – almost for 3-4 months. Under the government schemes, three wells and two hand pumps were installed in last 10-15 years, but most of them are dysfunctional. The problem becomes acute in the months of May-June, when there is a shortage of water everywhere and only perennial spring in the village supplies drinking water to 75 families. Women have to spend whole night queueing to fetch water. After a lot of perusal, water tanker was provided by Gram Panchayat, but supply is intermittent. Continue reading “Groundwater in Bundelkhand: Unique geological features in upper Ken River catchment need to be conserved”

Rainfall

State wise rainfall Pre Monsoon 2020 & Post monsoon 2019

India Meteorological Department (IMD) divides a water year (June 1 to May 31) into four seasons: Monsoon: (June 1 to Sept 30), Post monsoon (Oct 1 to Dec 31), Winter (Jan 1 to Feb 28/9) and Pre Monsoon (March 1 to May 31). For rainfall during all these seasons, IMD’s hydro-meteorological website[i] provides a lot of data on daily basis, including daily district wise rainfall, state-wise, sub division wise and river wise daily rainfall maps among many other weekly, monthly and seasonal products. However, one problem with it is that none of this information is achieved. So if you missed seeing or downloading available data on any date, there is no way to look at it even next day. This is even true of the seasonal rainfall maps, unfortunately.

Most observers look at the monsoon rainfall data, which is clearly the most important season, without doubt. However, the rainfall in other seasons is also very important from a number of perspectives.

Here we are giving a detailed account of the pre-monsoon season rainfall that India received in the season just ended on May 31, 2020, including state wise, sub division wise, river wise and also district wise figures. Along with it, we also provide the figures of post monsoon figures for the just concluded water year. For the winter season (Jan-Feb 2020) we have only the figures for Jan 2020 since we missed downloading the Feb 2020 figures. We had already provided the monsoon 2019 figures through two blogs in October 2019[ii].

Continue reading “State wise rainfall Pre Monsoon 2020 & Post monsoon 2019”

Dams · Water

विश्व पर्यावरण दिवस 2020: उत्तराखंड में गांव के जल स्रोतों के संरक्षण में जुटे पोखरी के युवा

उत्तराखंड के पर्वतीय इलाकों में प्राकृतिक जल स्रोत हजारों गांवों की जल जीवन रेखा है। इन्हें पन्यारा, नौला, छौई, धारा इत्यादि नामों से जाना जाता है। यह जल स्रोत प्राचीन समय से ही गांव में पीने एवं अन्य घरेलू आवश्यकताओं के लिए जलापूर्ति का मुख्य जरिया रहे हैं।

दुख की बात है कि बदलते दौर, जीवनशैली में आए बदलाव और पाइपलाइन आधारित पेयजल आपूर्ति के चलते, ये धरोहर पहाड़ समाज की अनदेखी और सरकार की उपेक्षा का शिकार हो रहे हैं। अगर इन जल स्रोतों को सहेजा जाये तो ये आज भी उतने ही प्रभावी एवं उपयोगी साबित हो सकते हैं।  पौड़ी गढ़वाल के पोखरी गांव के युवाओं का इसी  दिशा में एक काबिलेतारीफ प्रयास है। विश्व पर्यावरण दिवस 2020 की थीम प्रकृति का समय[i] के अवसर हमने महसूस किया कि इन युवाओं का प्रयास सबके सामने उजागर किये जाने लायक है।  

Continue reading “विश्व पर्यावरण दिवस 2020: उत्तराखंड में गांव के जल स्रोतों के संरक्षण में जुटे पोखरी के युवा”

Dams · Water

WED 2020: Uttarakhand workers return to revive traditional water sources

Traditional water sources have been water life line for most of villages in hill areas of Uttarakhand. Known as Panyar, Naula, Chhoi, Dhara these fresh water sources, springs have been serving rural population with potable and other domestic water requirements since time immemorial.  We thought this is possibly an appropriate story on this World Environment Day 2020 on June 5 with appropriately fitting theme “Time for Nature”.[i]

Sadly, with changing time, lifestyle and introduction of tap water facilities these water sources and structures have been facing negligence of users and apathy of government. These time proven water sources can still serve the people if restored and taken proper care by village communities. The story of Pokhri village in Pouri Garhwal district in Uttarakhand is a step in this direction.

Continue reading “WED 2020: Uttarakhand workers return to revive traditional water sources”

Dams · Sand Mining

Kerala 2020 Sand Mining: Don’t forget floods, fisherfolks & vanishing villages

Feature image: Schoolkids take a walk along the Chalakudy river in Arangali village. https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/kochi/ozhukanam-puzhakal-campaign-let-rivers-flow-without-hindrance/articleshow/68965530.cms (Times of India, 20 April 2019) 

The 2019 overview of sand mining in the Kerala showed how illegal mining of rivers had played its part in aggravating 2018 flood situation. Reports revealed that several rivers in the state turned dry and water level adjoining them dropped significantly soon after floods, despite excess rainfall, which was partly because of excessive mining and washing away of sand deposits which used to help recharge ground water.

Towards the end of 2018, the issue of unsustainable beach mining in Alappad surfaced and video of a 17 year old girl describing the adverse impact on coastal villages went viral. The effort earned National Green Tribunal (NGT) intervention. Meanwhile, the state govt agencies kept insisting on continued mining operations coastal area. This report provides an overview of state of affair through 2019 and 2020 so far.

Continue reading “Kerala 2020 Sand Mining: Don’t forget floods, fisherfolks & vanishing villages”

Dams · DRP News Bulletin

DRP NB 1 June 2020: No escape from Dam floods as dam lobby continues to dominate

Feature image: Officials of the irrigation department visited the breached Tiware dam near Chiplun in Ratnagiri, in July 2019. (Pratham Gokhale/HT Photo)

The report of the 10 member committee headed by Shri Nandkumar Vadnere, appointed by the Govt of Maharashtra in Aug 2019 was submitted on May 28, 2020. The report titled “A report on Floods 2019 (Krishna Sub-Basin): Experts Study Committee: Analysis, Causes, Remedies” from all accounts is a major let down as is apparent from the way one of the members felt so humiliated that he had to resign: he was not provided basic information to do justice to the Terms of Reference, his chapters were unilaterally removed from the draft report by the chairman, under pressure from higher ups. The report is actually an attempt to show, by hook or by crook that dams were not responsible for the Krishna basin floods of Aug 2019. Almost exactly the same way CWC came out with a shockingly unscientific, contradictory report about Aug 2018 Kerala floods to prove that dams had no role. The report did not even ask if the any of the dams followed the rule curve, though it made recommendation that rule curves should be followed! The story keeps repeating for each of the dozens of instances in recent years. The report of the Tiware dam disaster in Maharashtra in July 2019 has been submitted in Feb 2020, but is not yet in public domain. These few recent instances show how strong a strangle hold the dam lobby has over the official water institutions and governance in India. The Dam Safety bill now before the Parliament will not help as it has no provision to remove or even loosen this stranglehold, there is no place for independent oversight in the bill. Without an accountable reservoir operation policy, legal and institutional paradigm there is no possibility of freedom from dam induced floods.

Continue reading “DRP NB 1 June 2020: No escape from Dam floods as dam lobby continues to dominate”